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What is an hour of you time worth?

Posted by on Nov 4, 2013 in Character Development, Leadership, Personal Finance | 4 comments

What is an hour of you time worth?

  If you had one hour to live; how much would you pay for another hour?  This is a continuation of a previous  article “Are Money and Time equal.”  I am painfully aware that I am not using my time as wisely as I could.  I hope this exploration will encourage you and me to value our time properly. Generally humans are terrible assessors of risk. (Ways we get the odds wrong).  In the same way most of us are terrible at valuing our time.   We think we save money by “doing it ourselves.”  Often we end up paying ourselves a slave wage to save that money. I used to change my own oil.  I used a Motorcraft filter and Motorcraft synthetic blend motor oil.  I would go to the store pick up the oil, travel to my father’s, get his tools out, and change the oil.  It cost me $28-$34 in materials, plus my time, and my mileage.  The whole process took about 2 hours. My office is next door to a Ford Dealership.  During tax season, I had them change the oil for me.  They walked to my office picked up the vehicle.  They used the same materials I did.  They charge me $33 to $37 to change the oil. So how much was I paying myself to change my oil?  I was paid somewhere between $0.00 and $9 for 2 hours of my time. At best that is $4.50 per hour. It is easy to value time in that example, but how valuable is an hour with your wife?  Children? Or others you care about? There is a story about a little boy whose father worked very hard.  The father was always focused on making money.  The boy asked his father “How much do you make an hour?”  The father replies $50/hr.  The son goes into his room breaks into his piggy bank, seeing he only has $25 he asks his mom for $25.  At first she says no, but the boy keeps persisting until she relents. With $50 in hand the boy goes to his father.  He then asks his father “Can I buy an hour of your time?  I have $50.”   The father is crushed. The father realizes in that moment money and time are not equal. You can never buy more time with the ones you love.  Those hours can’t be priced.  Yet, if all you did was spend time with them would you value that time at all?  We need balance! We all have various areas of our life that require our time.  Are we budgeting our 168 hours each week in a way that reflects the importance of those areas in our life? We often budget our money (which we can always get more money).  But do we budget our time?  Our time is a finite commodity. What does your typical allocation of weekly hours look...

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What the sub-prime crisis taught me

Posted by on Oct 29, 2013 in Finding Destiny, Leadership, Personal Finance | 0 comments

What the sub-prime crisis taught me

From great tragedy comes great opportunity.  For the last few years we have all heard the sad stories that came from the sub-prime lending bubble.  When this combination of greed and ignorance imploded, it created an amazing opportunity. Houses went on sale, at the same time interest rates were falling to record lows.  This was a once in a lifetime event in real estate; unseen since the great depression. Those who recognized it, and were positioned to take advantage of it, have thrived. I recognized it, but was not in a great position to take advantage of it.  I lacked 3 major components that would have positioned me to better exploit this opportunity. Here are those 3 components and what I have learned. In 2007 as home prices were coming down I began buying.  My first purchase was 3 triplexes in a poverty stricken section of Louisville.  I acquired two additional properties in 2007, and kept purchasing homes over the next 18 months.   My first problem: Location There are 2 aspects of location: First was my location. I was living in Singapore and my properties were in Kentucky and Indiana.  I had a variety of assistance from others, including a “property manager”(more on this later), and partners.  I was only able to be onsite about twice a year and lacked the right person to watch my property.  It is hard to manage assets from 10,000 miles away. Proximity to your investment is good Location of the properties:  there is the famous line that 3 most important things in real estate is location, location and location.  While I would disagree, it is an important component in your evaluation. I overpaid for those 3 triplexes because of their location, not because of the buildings.  They were great buildings in a challenged area of Louisville.  I struggled to find tenants worth having.  These 3 properties would almost bankrupt me as I learned the next component.   Good neighborhoods attract good tenants Experience: I had very limited experience in owning residential rental real estate.  So, I hired a “property manager.”   Just because someone calls themselves a “property manager” doesn’t mean they are.  To this day I have not found a good property manager who will work in that part of Louisville. Rent would fail to be paid due to poor tenant selection. It seemed we evicted tenants every week.  I paid the lawyer to do the eviction.  Eviction process took 2 months (getting no rent). Then I had to pay to clean up and market the apartment again.  It is better to have a unit be empty than have a bad tenant. Bad tenants are rarely profitable I had bought way to many properties (we had 12 at the peak), to fast.  This amplified the cost of my ignorance and lack of experience.  Remodeling costs were higher, tenant occupancy lower, and rents lower than anticipated.  Only infusion of cash from my wife and I kept the venture together. When entering into uncharted waters start small (or your inexperience could sink you faster than a lead brick in water). The last component I lacked was: Capital. During college and early working years, I spent a substantial part of my income on eating out, expensive liquor, and two brand new vehicles.  This included about $20,000 dollars...

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Sometimes You Have To

Posted by on Sep 26, 2013 in Character Development, Finding Destiny, Leadership | 0 comments

Sometimes You Have To

I spent the last few weeks finishing work on a real estate renovation project.  I was supposed to have this finished by the end of August.  I had promised the tenants, who were moving in, that it would be done by September 7th.   Two weeks after they moved in the work was done. Spending 3 weeks working on this project put me behind in doing several things I wanted to do.  Such as writing blog posts and working on consulting projects.  It also drained me; I was so exhausted I started feeling like a Zombie. Why was I exhausted? I am not in the construction business.  While I enjoy components of it, I am a real estate investor.  I hire talented contractors to do the work right and quickly.  When a contractor disappeared on me I “had” to do several aspects of the work that were supposed to already be done.  (It was my management failure that allowed this work to get so far behind in the first place.) There aren’t many things in life we really “have” to do.  We choose to do them because we fear a particular consequence of not doing them.  I “had” to do this work (even though I don’t enjoy it) because integrity is a core value in my life. I made a promise. I failed to keep this promise, so I did all I could to remedy the situation as best I could.  I was emotionally drained.  I am still recovering from the time spent on that work. What I learned Doing work you aren’t passionate about is exhausting.   I didn’t hate the work, I just knew there were more important things that I should be doing.  That frustration was a mental burden that decreased my overall energy. There are times we should do things that we may not enjoy.  Sometimes because of responsibility or core values we “have” to do.   I have a plan to improve my process so I will not be caught in a situation like this again. There are many people who do things they hate for decades (like a job they hate “Just to pay the bills”).  They clothe their continuing toil in phrases that sound good.  Phrases like “I have to work here for the benefits” or “Nobody is hiring” or “I am too old to change jobs.”   Do you do want you want to do or what you “have to...

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Good deed for the day

Posted by on Jul 9, 2013 in Character Development, Customer Service, Finding Destiny, Leadership, Personal Finance | 2 comments

Good deed for the day

The other day I helped a friend of mine help a friend of his. As we were carrying in the elderly neighbor’s new hot water heater, my friend said “You have done your good deed for the day.” What is a good deed? His implication; it was good because I didn’t receive anything in return for it. I wasn’t paid. I spent my gas, time, and energy without any tangible benefit to me. I had spent all day, cleaning and showing a house to potential tenants. It is a really nice home extremely close to the University of Louisville. I enjoyed living there as a student, the home is nicer than when I lived in it. Now students get to derive the same benefits I enjoyed while living there. Were those activities good deeds? If we are paid for an activity is it no longer a good deed? In January one of my daughters contracted strep throat. She couldn’t even keep water down. She was extremely dehydrated and had a fever. After four hours in the emergency room she was doing much better. Was that a good deed the doctor and nurses performed? I was glad to give them some silly green pieces of paper for what they did. It was a very good deed for my family. Some will say “Yeah, but that is medical; it is different” So here a few people who have done good deeds for me in the last couple weeks (most of them received green certificates of appreciation) For more info on green certificates of appreciation I recommend reading “Thou Shall Prosper” Plumber unclogging a toilet at one of our properties The other 7 people who showed up the monthly Small biz meeting My wife who prepared dinner 3 times this week The cooks, servers, and managers at the restaurants, where I dined The contractors helping me renovate a home The people at the utility companies that provide me electricity, internet, water, and fire for cooking The road crews repairing the roads in West Lafayette so I have a smoother ride to church and daycare The people who make the disposable cups I use to hold coffee Bill Gates for having the vision to create Microsoft and the slew of programs I use People at WordPress who created the CMS that allows me to post these articles with ease As you can see there have probably been millions of people who have done good deeds from which I benefited from over the last couple of weeks. Each of us specializing allows all of us to benefit. Unless you are a drug dealer, thief, etc.; your specialization is valuable and a good deed.  It provides benefits for those who consume your product or service. Almost all of us are doing good deeds when we work. I don’t have to do something for free for it to be my good deed for the day. My days are filled with doing good deeds. Whether spending time with my wife and children, preparing the books for a business, managing our rentals, or writing these articles.  “It is all good”  Be proud of your good deeds today!!! Who has done a good deed for you today?...

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Do you have a sandcastle marriage?

Posted by on Jun 30, 2013 in Faith, Finding Destiny, Parenting, Personal Finance | 0 comments

Do you have a sandcastle marriage?

Picture a beautiful sandcastle. Hours spent crafting intricate towers and walls.  Elements in the sand glisten as the sun sets. In the “perfect” location, Ocean front property. This beach is amazing, gentle sand, clear water, and void of human clutter. It is perfection… Until… The tide begins to rise. The sky turns dark with angry clouds. The wind begins screaming like a toddler tantrum. The waves become larger and larger… then with a violent crushing force… The sandcastle is obliterated. There is no trace of those hours of work. The beauty of it is gone. A sandcastle marriage seems great when there are clear skies and calm seas. Everyone will tell you how beautiful it is. BUT when the storms of life, the baggage of the past, frustrations of the current day, and stress of 2 people becoming 1 appear, the greatness fades. That beautiful sandcastle marriage is shattered by the crashing waves of life. Some foundations of a Sandcastle marriage: Infatuation (a powerful feeling that can fool even the best of us) Lust (desire to derive personal pleasure, satisfaction, or status from that sexy, powerful, or wealthy person) Baggage (lots of intimate experiences with others outside the covenant of marriage or other unhealthy dating relationships) Selfishness (My spouse is going to do all these things for me) Co-dependency (Need to fix someone else’s problem, making it your problem. Enabling the other person in the process) Unresolved emotional issues (most of us have things in our past that could use resolution, perhaps with the assistance of a counselor or physiologist) None of these provide a foundation for marriage. A long-term successful marriage has a strong foundation. When the storms of life come blasting in; it may damage aspects of the marriage relationship for a season, but the foundation is solid. The couple can easier stand back up and rebuild together on that solid foundation. Some foundations for a life-long marriage Love (a choice one makes, love is not a feeling. Hollywood wants us to believe love is a magical feeling but in reality it is a choice. Infatuation and lust are the feelings often mistaken for love) Purity (I can only talk about this one from the other side as I wasn’t pure before marriage. I know what it is like to have your mind constantly bombarded with past baggage. Baggage that comes crashing in on your mind with waves of guilt and shame.) Honesty and trust (speaking the truth with gentleness, being trustworthy and trusting) Communication (Set aside times to communicate about your life together, Daily is best) Vision and goals (What is your shared vision? You can’t have separate visions for your life or your foundation will crack) Dedication and loyalty (Divorce is not an option. Be dedicated to finding a solution. Speak well of each other to others and to each other) I am sure several of you have some other foundation blocks you could add. Please share them in the comments below. None of us are perfect with all of these points. Sometimes our marriage foundations have cracks in them. Be quick to address and work together to fix them. While harder to repair, they are so worth taking the time to repair. There is an exponential power released when a married couple comes together...

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Is your money Lazy? (The power of compounding)

Posted by on Jun 27, 2013 in Finding Destiny, Perfect questions, Personal Finance | 2 comments

Is your money Lazy? (The power of compounding)

In Wealth creation pt 1 we discussed the accumulation of bricks of abundance.  In The Power of a Seed we discussed how planting our seed (Asset) produces a harvest. Compounding: the concept of reinvesting our harvest.  How reinvesting your returns from investments grows your assets. Here is an example of the basic concept. You spend $1000 on a bond that  pays 10%/year Year Year Interest Total Interest Balance 1 $ 100.00 $ 100.00 $ 1,100.00 2 $ 110.00 $ 210.00 $ 1,210.00 3 $ 121.00 $ 331.00 $ 1,331.00 4 $ 133.10 $ 464.10 $ 1,464.10 5 $ 146.41 $ 610.51 $ 1,610.51 6 $ 161.05 $ 771.56 $ 1,771.56 7 $ 177.16 $ 948.72 $ 1,948.72 8 $ 194.87 $ 1,143.59 $ 2,143.59 9 $ 214.36 $ 1,357.95 $ 2,357.95 10 $ 235.79 $ 1,593.74 $ 2,593.74 11 $ 259.37 $ 1,853.12 $ 2,853.12 12 $ 285.31 $ 2,138.43 $ 3,138.43 13 $ 313.84 $ 2,452.27 $ 3,452.27 14 $ 345.23 $ 2,797.50 $ 3,797.50 15 $ 379.75 $ 3,177.25 $ 4,177.25 16 $ 417.72 $ 3,594.97 $ 4,594.97 17 $ 459.50 $ 4,054.47 $ 5,054.47 18 $ 505.45 $ 4,559.92 $ 5,559.92 19 $ 555.99 $ 5,115.91 $ 6,115.91 20 $ 611.59 $ 5,727.50 $ 6,727.50 In 20 years your $1,000 has increased to over $6,700 and you will earn $670 in the next year.  In year one notice it was only $100.  That movement from $100 to $670 is compounding in action. If you consumed(spent) that $100 each year, you would only earn $100 each year. In our next example let’s say we invest an average American car payment each month in addition to that initial $1,000 investment. (We are using $350 for car payment as the average ranges from $300 to $550 per month) Year Year Deposits Year Interest Total Deposits Total Interest Balance 1 $ 4,200.00 $ 324.19 $ 5,200.00 $ 324.19 $ 5,524.19 2 $ 4,200.00 $ 776.61 $ 9,400.00 $ 1,100.79 $ 10,500.79 3 $ 4,200.00 $ 1,274.27 $ 13,600.00 $ 2,375.06 $ 15,975.06 4 $ 4,200.00 $ 1,821.69 $ 17,800.00 $ 4,196.76 $ 21,996.76 5 $ 4,200.00 $ 2,423.86 $ 22,000.00 $ 6,620.62 $ 28,620.62 6 $ 4,200.00 $ 3,086.25 $ 26,200.00 $ 9,706.87 $ 35,906.87 7 $ 4,200.00 $ 3,814.87 $ 30,400.00 $ 13,521.74 $ 43,921.74 8 $ 4,200.00 $ 4,616.36 $ 34,600.00 $ 18,138.11 $ 52,738.11 9 $ 4,200.00 $ 5,498.00 $ 38,800.00 $ 23,636.10 $ 62,436.10 10 $ 4,200.00 $ 6,467.80 $ 43,000.00 $ 30,103.90 $ 73,103.90 11 $ 4,200.00 $ 7,534.58 $ 47,200.00 $ 37,638.48 $ 84,838.48 12 $ 4,200.00 $ 8,708.04 $ 51,400.00 $ 46,346.52 $ 97,746.52 13 $ 4,200.00 $ 9,998.84 $ 55,600.00 $ 56,345.36 $ 111,945.36 14 $ 4,200.00 $ 11,418.72 $ 59,800.00 $ 67,764.08 $ 127,564.08 15 $ 4,200.00 $ 12,980.60 $ 64,000.00 $ 80,744.67 $ 144,744.67 16 $ 4,200.00 $ 14,698.66 $ 68,200.00 $ 95,443.33 $ 163,643.33 17 $ 4,200.00 $ 16,588.52 $ 72,400.00 $ 112,031.85 $ 184,431.85 18 $ 4,200.00 $ 18,667.37 $ 76,600.00 $ 130,699.22 $ 207,299.22 19 $ 4,200.00 $ 20,954.11 $ 80,800.00 $ 151,653.33 $ 232,453.33 20 $ 4,200.00 $ 23,469.52 $ 85,000.00 $ 175,122.85 $ 260,122.85 In this example over 20 years we have invested $85,000 and the current value is over $260,000. Your investment of just...

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#YOLO (so do it right)

Posted by on Jun 12, 2013 in Character Development, Finding Destiny, Leadership | 0 comments

#YOLO (so do it right)

First for those who aren’t aware, YOLO is an acronym for “You Only Live Once.”  It is often used as an excuse for people to act like a moron. Why I used it:  we do only have one life to live on earth so perhaps it would be wise to try and do it right.  Experience and making mistakes is a vital part of the learning process.  And yet it is often possible for us to learn from the mistakes and experience of others.  This gives us the ability to skip some lessons and move on to greater challenges and opportunities. “Where there is no guidance the people fall, But in abundance of counselors there is victory.” (Hebrew proverb 11:14)   This proverb insinuates that these are wise counselors and not foolish ones.  So how do we determine if the counsel we are receiving is wise?  Here are 3 questions that will help us discern between wise and foolish counsel.  So we can do our life right! Do they have experience in this area? There is a story about a multi-millionaire business man who brought in several other successful businessmen for an opportunity with amazing potential.  The first question the leader asked was, “Who here has never failed in business?”  Two men raised there hands.  He asked them to leave. In this new venture it would look like they would fail.  The leader only wanted those on his team who had been crushed by failure.  Why? These men were all currently successful, so if they had failed before it meant; They had picked themselves up and gone for it again. When it looked as though this venture would fail the leader wanted men who would push even harder for success. If you can, find the counsel of someone who has been through what you are facing.  It is much easier to start walking on the path another cut.  Often you will get there faster than they did.  Then you can use their ending point as a launching point for a new adventure. Do they want the best for you? A young lady at a licentious party could easily receive a multitude of counsel to remove her clothing.  The question she should ask “Are those providing this counsel thinking of my best interest?” Or “do they simply want to satisfy their own servacive desires?”  (Servacive = Self-serving). Wise counsel should be focused on what is best for you.  When I prepare your tax return my focus is on 2 things.  First, Making sure you pay everything you owe the IRS, but not a penny more.  Second, helping you understand the possible tax implications of future decisions.   My focus is completely on you and you can trust the heart of my counsel on your tax situation.  However, I am viewing your situation from one perspective.  This leads into….. Did you get a diversity of opinions? If you are buying a home, you can get wise counsel from a Real estate agent.  However, stopping there would be unwise.  Your Realtor has only one perspective and only get paid if you by the home. We could also get advice from a lender, a contractor, and perhaps a home inspector (although be careful using one recommended by your realtor).  I would also get counsel...

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Have a fire plan (Daddy’s love)

Posted by on Jun 11, 2013 in Faith, Parenting | 2 comments

Have a fire plan (Daddy’s love)

This article will be different. It is born of an emotional story of a father who died trying to rescue his 3 year old and 18 month old daughters.  At the time of writing this article, the ages of my first 2 daughters is very similar to the ages of those young girls.  When I read it I picture my Ruth and Abigail.  Read the story here. First you will read a simple poem.  It is an emotional outlet for the pain I feel as I picture that 3 year old in her room screaming for her daddy.  Next is a section about a father’s love.  Then lastly I discuss lessons we can learn from this tragedy. A father found holding the baby, A daughter silent in her room No more tears will they shed Lives taken much to soon What is a father to do? When he has done all Nothing more to give He answered the call Human flesh facing the limit Nothing more he could bring Wishing he could find a way As the flames begin to sing No regard for himself Daughters his only concern Courage born of love Our lesson to learn Tears flow as I write this poem inspired by such loss.  I have daughters of a similar age.  I too would run back in the flames without a second thought.  Even if there was nothing I could do.  So deep, is a real father’s love. If you didn’t have the opportunity to experience this love from an earthly Father, there is hope.  It is from that same heart of love; Father God sent His only son to die so that you might have eternal life.  Your heavenly Father, who created you, loves you greater than any earthly father ever could. Our lesson to learn; First this is not a meant to be judgment in any form toward anyone who inspired this story.  It is a tragedy and the wife and mother needs our prayers that her broken heart will be healed.   Pray that she finds a future with hope and doesn’t blame herself.  It was not anyone’s fault.   It just sucks. We can learn some lessons; that perhaps will prevent and reduce the occurrence of such tragedy in the future. Create a family fire plan. (Here is a great resource for doing this) Especially what happens when we are sleeping. What parent will take what child? Where is the primary exit? Where will we meet? Having a plan will allow your brain to focus your adrenaline rush.  Without a plan it is very easy for the adrenaline to turn into panic and cause bad decisions. Have working smoke detectors in your bedrooms and test them. If your home has knob and tube wiring replace it.  This stuff is ancient and extremely dangerous. Know common causes here is a list of the 10 most common causes of household fires. Please don’t ignore this subject because it is scary or uncomfortable.   If you create a plan it should alleviate fears.  Do a risk assessment based on the common causes work to reduce them.  Talking about this is loving those you care about.   Most likely you will never face a serious fire in your home; But lets be prepared because the risk of being...

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Prison has great benefits (It’s not you It’s Me)

Posted by on Jun 6, 2013 in Finding Destiny | 0 comments

Prison has great benefits (It’s not you It’s Me)

I was preparing a tax return and the client asked me if I could work for the IRS.  I said, “I could, but why would I want too?”  His response “They have great benefits.” I quickly replied, “Prison has better benefits.” Prison benefits: Free housing Free food Free exercise equipment Free medical care Free cable Free education When I first graduated college I had a “great” job at Ford Motor in Dearborn Michigan.  I have been a Ford fan ever since I can remember.  12 of the 18 vehicles I have purchased have been Fords.  I was getting to work for my favorite car company!!! The pay was great for a fresh grad. The benefits were even better.  I really liked how the upper management would focus on things they could fix (Which is why they didn’t go bankrupt and get a bailout). But….  I hated my job.  After just 5 weeks I was so frustrated driving to work one morning; realizing  I just didn’t want to be there.  After an attempt by some awesome finance managers to transfer me to a more fulfilling position (halted by bureaucratic HR people); I resigned after just 3 months and 1 day on the job. I still like Ford, and believe it is a well-run company.  I just didn’t fit in that environment.  I had to let them know “It is not you, it is me.”  I am not one who will let golden handcuffs keep me in a job I hate.   That experience was a great step in defining what type of organization I work with the best.  It was not a bad experience, quite on the contrary it was wonderful.  It taught me about me.  It is a major contributing factor as to why, I know I won’t enjoy working for the IRS. The benefits of a job do not matter to me when making a decision where to work.  This doesn’t mean they should not matter to you.  Our first responsibility is to be responsible adults and provide for our family’s needs. I make choices to forgo certain luxuries at this stage of life, so I can be free from the “grey walls of a prison.” Are great benefits “golden handcuffs” keeping you in a job you...

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Just Working to pay the Bills (Does your life have meaning?)

Posted by on Jun 3, 2013 in Character Development, Finding Destiny | 2 comments

Just Working to pay the Bills (Does your life have meaning?)

I started chatting with a friend whom I had not talked in years. Their answer my query “How are things going?” was “Just working to pay the bills. You know how it is.” I quickly replied “I don’t really work much anymore; I just do what I love most of the time.”  Their reply “why don’t you work?” Why don’t I work? I refuse to spend the majority of my week doing something I don’t enjoy.  I refuse to do the same thing every day.   I will spend my time pursuing my passions and doing the things I love. What do I do if I don’t work? Business Consulting/Accounting: I love being able to see how businesses are doing and help the owner find a way to be more successful.  I love creating strategies for success Taxes: I love helping people keep as much of their money from the greedy government as legally possible. Coaching: We are all created for a purpose, we can all use help finding that purpose. I enjoy helping others create a plan do their purpose, then prepare for their purpose, then DO their purpose. Real estate: I love dirt and I love buildings.  I enjoy being involved in the transformation of a building. Spending time with my family:  I love the flexibility to be the parent who stays home when our daughter can’t go to daycare.  I enjoy getting my daughters ready for daycare in the morning.  I enjoy being able to occasionally prepare dinner for my family.   Writing, Speaking, Teaching:  I love expressing my thoughts whether composing a poem, teaching middle school students at church, writing  blog post, or speaking to a group. I want to get better at each of those.  So, I make writing and creating presentations a priority in my life. In each of these things there are times when I get frustrated.  They even have parts that I don’t like doing.  However, I don’t dread Monday.  I don’t view the weekend with great awe. I enjoy my life everyday! I am “Living the Dream!!!”  “If I was any better I would be in Heaven!!!”  If any of you ask my how I am doing you have probably heard one of these responses.  In that moment I may feel that way or I may be proclaiming it by faith.  Either way it is the truth of my life. What if You don’t enjoy your life every day? Ask yourself why?  Serious stop and ask “Why don’t I enjoy my life every day?”  ….  Do you have some reasons?  Now what can you do to change that situation? The most powerful thing in your situation you can change is you.  Your attitude and your actions are the one thing you have complete control over.  Perhaps you just have a bad attitude? Next and somewhat related step, ask yourself what you like about your life?  Maybe you should sit down and write a list of why you like your job, your relationships, your home, your family. Now do the same thing what is it you don’t enjoy about your life?  Is it work?  What is it about your job you don’t like?  Why do you dread Monday morning?  Side-note: If this list is full of things that you can’t control such...

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